Golden State Killer victim’s daughter gives ‘sick monster’ the finger in court

Golden State Killer victim’s daughter gives ‘sick monster’ the finger in court

The daughter of one of the Golden State Killer’s victims gave him the finger in court and said he had a “little penis”.

Joseph DeAngelo listened to those who survived his murderous reign give impact statements describing in detail the horrors he inflicted upon them.

He also came face to face with ex-fiancee Bonnie Ueltzen whose name he shouted during at least one rape after she dumped him as a teen.

In June, the 74-year-old pleaded guilty to 13 counts of murder, 13 counts of kidnapping, and confessed to 161 uncharged crimes – many of which were rapes – which go back beyond America’s statute of limitations.

He admitted attacking 87 victims at 53 separate crime scenes spanning 11 California counties in a plea deal that spared him the death penalty.

He is expected to be sentenced to life in prison on Friday.

Victims appearing at Sacramento County Superior Court described enduring hours of torture while they were bound, blindfolded, gagged, beaten and raped during attacks that date back to 1975.

Rape survivor Patricia Murphy’s daughter recounted how her mother’s attack forever changed and, ultimately, tore apart her family.

“He and his knife had complete control over me for the next two hours,” she said in a statement, which was read in court by her daughter, Patti Cosper.

“Did his little penis drive him to be so angry all the time?

“He truly is an evil monster with no soul.”

Murphy was 29-years-old and going through a separation from her husband when she was attacked in September 1976.

“That night forever changed me,” she added.

Cosper, in her own statement, raised her middle finger, telling DeAngelo he “can go straight to hell.”

Meanwhile, Ueltzen, who was engaged to DeAngelo in the early 1970s before breaking it off, was not allowed to speak to the court as she is not listed as a victim but she joined rape victim Jane Carson-Sandler.

Introducing her, Carson-Sandler said: “I also want to especially thank a friend who is accompanying me here today. That friend is Bonnie.

“If Bonnie were able to speak Joe, she would want you to know Joe that as just a teenager 50 years ago she broke her engagement to you when she realised that you had become manipulative and abusive.

“Even a gun pointed at her face could not make her choose you.”

Ueltzen was engaged to DeAngelo in the early 1970s, but she broke it off.

A few nights later, she was asleep when she awoke to a tapping on her bedroom window.

She pulled aside the curtain to see a handgun inches from her face being held by DeAngelo.

“Get dressed,” he ordered. “We’re going to Reno.”

She ran to the end of the hall to her parents’ room, where she woke her father, who told her to lock herself in the bathroom and wait until he came to get her.

DeAngelo left after talking to her dad.

The snub by Ueltzen preyed on his mind. During at least one of his series of attacks, the killer lay down next to his victim after raping her said:

“I hate you. I hate you. I hate you, Bonnie.”

DeAngelo eluded his former colleagues for decades until his DNA was linked to the crimes through a genealogy website that one of his relatives had submitted theirs too.

As a burglar, he was known as the Visalia Ransacker before becoming a sexual predator called the East Area Rapist.

Between the burglaries and rapes, he started killing, earning himself the nickname of the Golden State Killer.

Victims will continue their impact statements today before he is sentenced.

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